Candid Comments - How do you support children?

Master Sgt. Michael Maple, an aircraft generation mechanic with the 452nd Maintance Squadron and air conditioning contractor is from Wellsville, Ohio.  His wife, Malee and daughter Morgan participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Linda Welz)

Master Sgt. Michael Maple, an aircraft generation mechanic with the 452nd Maintenance Squadron and air conditioning contractor is from Wellsville, Ohio. His wife, Malee and daughter Morgan participate in the Yellow Ribbon Program. (U.S. Air Force photo/Linda Welz)

Master Sgt. Erin Brotsch, a boom operator for the 336th Air Refueling Squadron is from San Bernardino, Calif. and persuing a psycology degree and likes reading.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Linda Welz)

Master Sgt. Erin Brotsch, a boom operator for the 336th Air Refueling Squadron is from San Bernardino, Calif. and pursuing a psychology degree and likes reading. (U.S. Air Force photo/Linda Welz)

Staff Sgt. Ana Partida, a customer service technician for the 452nd Force Support Squadron is from Boulder City, Nev., and likes action movies, going to Disneyland, drawing and shopping.  (U.S. Air Force photo/Linda Welz)

Staff Sgt. Ana Partida, a customer service technician for the 452nd Force Support Squadron is from Boulder City, Nev., and likes action movies, going to Disneyland, drawing and shopping. (U.S. Air Force photo/Linda Welz)

MARCH AIR RESERVE BASE, Calif. -- We feature Candid Comments on the back page of The Beacon on a regular basis.  April is the Month of the Military Child, so we asked Team March members what they did to support their child or children.  Here are the answers we published. 

Master Sgt. Michael Maple, pictured with his wife, Malee, and daughter, Morgan, said, "We enrolled in the Yellow Ribbon Program. We also are band and softball volunteers at Canyon Springs High School where Morgan plays the clarinet, oboe and bass clarinet. We lead by example and talk about how great we feel (when we volunteer) to inspire others. In the absence of a parent, Skype and email provide relief. If there's a minor crisis, we try to tell them they will be alright."

Master Sgt. Erin Brotsch said, "I attend programs at my son's elementary school to speak and show a video presentation to help the kids learn the importance of our military and those who serve. Some kids may feel that the parent's job is more important to the parent than they are. I tell my son that I do what I do for him. (A small gift after trips helps, too!) We should make time for our children. What we teach them today has a lasting impact on them and how they will raise their own children."

Staff Sgt. Ana Partida said, "Yellow Ribbon is a great program for children to understand what parents go through when they deploy. My four kids and teen brother-in-law inspire me to stay involved and to let them know I'm in it for them. Parents are busy, but if they just take some time to ask their child about his or her day, it shows the child his or her parent is interested in what that child does. The more parents get involved, the less kids get
in trouble."

Feel free to comment here, on our Facebook page or via Twitter.  We'd like to know how would you answer our Candid Comments question.