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Mystery solved: Secrets to building a strong resume

The Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), an organization whose vision is to develop and promote a culture in which employers support and value the military service of their employees, is partnering with the Employer Partnership of the Armed Forces (EPAF) to provide hiring employers with the ability to post available jobs and for servicemembers to post resumes, search for jobs, and make a connection with potential employers through www.EmployerPartnership.org.

The Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), an organization whose vision is to develop and promote a culture in which employers support and value the military service of their employees, is partnering with the Employer Partnership of the Armed Forces (EPAF) to provide hiring employers with the ability to post available jobs and for servicemembers to post resumes, search for jobs, and make a connection with potential employers through www.EmployerPartnership.org.

MARCH AIR RESERVE BASE, CALIF. -- (This article is the final of a three part series on how to compose an effective resume.)

References and recommendation letters are optional. If you choose to include references, make sure they are aware a recruitment agent may be contacting them and beforehand, inform them about type of job you are seeking. Send your references a copy of your resume in advance to advise them of your activities, this way, they will be able to speak knowingly when discussing your past work performances and responsibilities. Recommendation letters are most effective if coming from a previous employer and include dates, places and accomplishments.

Remember, references and recommendation letters are available upon request.

The following are recommended resume checks:

1. Run a spell check on your computer before anyone will read your resume

2.  Have someone conduct a grammar review, preferably someone with a good grasp of English, grammar and spelling

3.  Get a second opinion from another source. Misspelled words and awkward phrases are likely to be seen and corrected from various perspectives.

The following are recommended design tips, which will make your resume easier to read and/or scan into an employer's database:

1. Use a font size of 12 to 14 points

2. Use non-decorative typefaces

3. Choose one typeface and stick to it

4. Avoid italics, script, and underlined words

5. Do not use horizontal or vertical lines, graphics, or shading

The following are online resources leads:

1. US Department of Defense Transition Assistance Program: http://turbotap.org/register.tpp (Hosts live webinars and transition assistance documents on their site)

2. US Department of Labor's Career One Stop: http://www.careerinfonet.org/moc/default.aspx?nodeid=213 (Hosts a Military to Civilian occupation translator)

3. Military to Civilian Occupation Translator: http://www.careerinfonet.org/moc/

4. Transition Assistance Program Workbook: http://www.dol.gov/vets/programs/tap/tapmanualmar06.pdf

Remember, each resume is unique. There is a tremendous amount of information on the Internet, which can sometimes be confusing and leave you contemplating which approach to take when preparing a winning resume. If you apply for a position and are not called in for an interview, go back to the drawing board to review and tweak the information on your resume. Take your time when writing it. Consider your skills and abilities as major selling points on your resume. Be sure to have friends, family or coworkers review it and offer additional tips or critiques as they may catch something you missed.